Sell Mineral Rights - Learn More About Mineral Rights

 

"How do I know how much my mineral rights are worth?"

Click here to learn more about how to value your mineral rights.  
Or give us a call and we can help estimate the value for you FOR FREE.
Click here to contact us for your FREE ESTIMATE.

 

What are Mineral Rights?

Mineral rights are the legal rights to the minerals and deposits underneath the surface of a property.  This means that the owner of the mineral rights owns the rights to any oil and gas that could exist beneath the surface, whether or not they own the actual surface property.  If you own the minerals, you also have the right to access those minerals reasonably which usually allows the mineral owner to access the surface property to mine or drill for the oil, gas, coal, etc.

Can you own the mineral rights without owning the surface land?

Yes, you CAN own the mineral rights without owning the surface land.  Often times, land owners have sold off mineral rights without selling their land.  Others have sold their land but kept the mineral rights.  Throughout generations, these interests in the mineral rights have been passed down  and split into smaller portions multiple times.  Though it is possible to own the mineral rights and the surface land together as one property, the mineral rights have often times been severed and broken down into partial interests over the years.

How much are minerals worth?

Like real estate, its all about location.  Minerals are usually sold by the acre but can range in price from under a hundred dollars per acre to several thousand per acre depending on the location and the history of oil and gas production in the area.  Other factors that contribute to the price or value of mineral rights include whether or not the acres are leased and the terms of the lease.

Should I sell my mineral rights?

The problem with owning mineral rights is the uncertainty that goes along with ownership.  If the minerals are not currently producing, they are worth far less.  This can make it more difficult to sell your minerals since potential buyers will be taking a gamble on whether or not there will be producing oil and gas wells on that property in the future.  The truth is, even minerals surrounded by good wells may not be right for drilling and producing oil and gas, since the geology is subject to change. Holding on to your minerals means that you are taking the same gamble.

"How do I know how much my mineral rights are worth?"

Click here to learn more about how to value your mineral rights.  Or give us a call and we can help estimate the value for you FOR FREE. Click here to contact us for your FREE ESTIMATE.

 

Receive a Free Quote

For a risk-free quote, with no cost and no obligation, please fill out the following short form.
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
  
 
 

Energies Monitor

Latest News

  • Utah plans to take legal action against EPA over mine waste
    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes said Friday he plans to take legal action against the Environmental Protection Agency following reports that it didn't alert the state to river contamination after a massive mine waste spill.
  • House panel calls governor, EPA chief to testify on Flint

    HOLD FOR STORY BY DAVID EGGERT- FILE- In a file photo from Feb. 5, 2016, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, center and Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Deacon Omar Odette, right, meet with volunteers helping to load vehicles with bottled water in Flint, Mich. Snyder's standing as one of the GOP's most accomplished governors has taken a beating in the lead-contaminated water emergency in Flint. Democrats, especially those running for president, are pointing to mistakes by Snyder's administration during the crisis as a vivid example of Republican-style cost-cutting run amok. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)WASHINGTON (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said Friday he has agreed to testify to Congress about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, bowing to demands by Democrats that the Republican governor explain his role in a cost-cutting move that resulted in a public health emergency caused by lead-contaminated water.


  • Valero Energy sues U.S. EPA over biofuels plan

    The prices at a Valero Energy Corp gas station are pictured in PasadenaBy Chris Prentice NEW YORK (Reuters) - Valero Energy Corp filed lawsuits against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday to push the regulator to alter a U.S. policy designed to boost use of renewables in transportation fuels. The country's top refiner and No. 3 ethanol producer filed a challenge with the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington to review the EPA's latest Renewable Fuel Standard plans for 2014-2016. Oil refiners are required to meet EPA targets for biofuel use.